x

Like what you see? Ask us for a full-length preview and pricing options for our entire course catalog

Request full preview

Based on: 30 CFR Part 46.5.b.4

Languages: English

Sample Transcript

Ensuring that you and others on site stay visible to mobile equipment can significantly reduce accidents on the job site. Blind spots, weather conditions, time of day, and large obstacles can all reduce visibility for equipment operators and pedestrians. Follow these best practices for improving visibility on or around mobile equipment. Wear high-visibility or high viz reflective safety vests. Keep windows clean and undamaged, wiper blades maintained, windshield defrosters operational, and mirrors properly adjusted. Add or enlarge mirrors to vehicles as needed. Mount stationary mirrors at areas of restricted visibility. Use headlights, fog lights, and additional vehicle lights when necessary. Use whip antenna flags or strobe lights to increase visibility on smaller vehicles. And use fixed or portable light plants at loading or dump points as needed.

Working Around Mining Equipment

Training Time: 39 minutes

Working around mobile and stationary equipment can expose miners and others on-site to a range of physical and environmental hazards. This course discusses pre-operational equipment checks, seat belt use, equipment blind spots, and communication methods. It also illustrates hazards of working around highwalls, piles, conveyors, and other mining equipment.

Request full-length preview
Expertly Designed For Maximum Retention
Multiple Language Support
SCORM/AICC Compliant eLearning Modules
Training Content + Interactive Quizzes
Be sure to receive proper training and instruction on refueling procedures prior to performing any refueling operations.

Be sure to receive proper training and instruction on refueling procedures prior to performing any refueling operations.

Guarding provides a physical barrier between workers and potentially hazardous machine motions or actions.

Guarding provides a physical barrier between workers and potentially hazardous machine motions or actions.

Pedestrians should make and confirm eye contact to ensure that an equipment operator is aware of your presence, understands your instructions, or has clearly communicated movement or operational intentions.

Pedestrians should make and confirm eye contact to ensure that an equipment operator is aware of your presence, understands your instructions, or has clearly communicated movement or operational intentions.

Learning Objectives

  • State why wearing seat belts is important
  • Describe ways to improve visibility
  • List common workplace communication methods
  • List the steps in a pre-operational check
  • Identify best practices for operating mobile equipment
  • Identify procedures for safely working around highwalls and piles
  • Identify best practices for refueling and parking mobile equipment
  • Identify best practices for working around stationary equipment
  • State the purpose of equipment guarding
  • State the purpose of an emergency stop cord
  • Identify best practices for avoiding ejected material hazards
  • Identify best practices for avoiding airborne dust hazards
Contact us for full course preview

Working Around Mining Equipment FAQs

Why is wearing a seat belt important when operating mobile equipment at surface mines?
Accident investigation statistics report that a majority of the mobile equipment fatalities at surface mines involve victims who had access to seat belts but were not wearing them.

What are some ways to improve communication when working around mining equipment?
Using sight, sound, and telecommunications. This can include confirming eye contact to ensure that an equipment operator is aware of your presence, sounding the horn before starting it or putting it in motion, and using radios and phones to communicate effectively.

What are some of the dangers of working with equipment around highwalls?
Working with equipment around highwalls can be especially dangerous due to unexpected rock slides or falling material that can seriously or fatally injure miners and damage equipment.

What are some of the dangers of refueling mobile equipment?
Refueling mobile equipment can put workers at risk of exposure to harmful fumes, as well as fire and explosion hazards from flammable and combustible liquids.

What are some of the dangers of improperly parked or unsecured mobile equipment?
Improperly parked or unsecured mobile equipment can unexpectedly move or roll, posing pinch and crush hazards to workers and potentially damaging property.

What are some of the dangers of working around stationary equipment?
Working around stationary equipment, including conveyors, crushers, classifiers, hoppers, and generators, can expose miners or others on-site to hazardous machine motion and energy.

What are some of the dangers of working around high amounts of dust?
Dry, dusty conditions can put miners and others on-site at risk of developing a respiratory illness or disease. With prolonged exposure, miners can develop an irreversible and potentially deadly condition known as silicosis.

Get pricing info & access full-length samples from our entire catalog