Vehicle-Mounted Aerial Device Safety

SKU: C-1094Duration: 39 Minutes

Pay-per-view (PPV) format perfect for individual users.

Get immediate access to this interactive eLearning course online. Must be used within 30 days, expires 48 hours after launch.

Language:  English

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Course Details

Specs

Training Time: 39 minutes

Compatibility: Desktop, Tablet, Phone

Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

Vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating work platforms (also called aerial lifts, aerial devices, and bucket trucks) can provide temporary elevated workspaces as an alternative to ladders or scaffolding. This interactive online course will list the types and categories of vehicle-mounted aerial devices (VMADs) and their main components, discuss safe work practices when working with VMADs, requirements for owners, users, and operators, as well as inspection requirements for VMADs.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the types and main components of Vehicle-Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms (or aerial devices)
  • Describe the equipment design and control requirements for vehicle-mounted aerial devices in ANSI and CSA Standards
  • Describe the difference between "gloving" and "bare-hand' electrical work
  • Describe the 5 categories (A through E) of vehicle-mounted aerial devices
  • Identify the main hazards associated with using an aerial device
  • List safe work practices for aerial devices
  • List the requirements for owners, users, and operators of vehicle-mounted aerial devices
  • Describe the inspection requirements for vehicle-mounted aerial devices

Key Questions

The following key questions are answered in this module:

Who develops standards related to the design, construction, and use of vehicle-mounted aerial devices?
The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and Canadian Standard Association (CSA) have developed standards related to the design, construction, and use of vehicle-mounted aerial devices.

What is an aerial device?
An aerial devices is any device, extensible, articulating, or both, which is primarily designed and used to position personnel.

What is the purpose of a fall arrest system?
A fall arrest system is designed to stop a person's fall after it has begun.

What is gloving work?
Gloving work is a method of performing live work in energized electrical conductors and equipment where workers wear special insulating gloves and sometimes sleeves.

What are the main hazards when using a vehicle-mounted aerial device?
The main hazards are overturning, falling from the platform or ladder, collisions, electric shock and falling objects.

Sample Video Transcript

Below is a transcript of the video sample provided for this module:

ANSI and CSA Standards for vehicle-mounted aerial devices include the following design requirements: •Work platforms must have guardrails and intermediate rails on all sides, or be fully enclosed, up to a height of between 39 and 45 inches (0.99 and 1.14 m). •Toeboards or kickplates at least 4 inches (102 mm) high must be provided on all sides, except at entrances. •Anchorages capable of withstanding 3,600 lbs (16,000 Newtons) of static force must be provided on the boom, platform, or platform mounting for the allowable number of occupants. •Platform access must be provided in the lowered or stowed position, and flexible gates and chains can be used to secure openings up to 30 inches (762 mm) wide. •Means of securing the boom or counterbalanced ladder during transport or travel must be provided. Locking pins must be secured to prevent unintentional disengagement and loss. •Insulating baskets and buckets must be constructed of non-conductive materials, not have any holes or openings, and be tested for dielectric integrity in accordance with applicable standards. •Non-insulating buckets and baskets intended for use with insulating liners must be constructed of non- conductive materials or capable of operating with boom tip covers and be identified as non-insulating. The liners must be made of non-conductive materials, not have any holes or openings, and be tested for dielectric integrity in accordance with applicable standards. •Non-insulating buckets and baskets for use without liners may be constructed of conductive or non- conductive materials and have holes or openings. They must be identified as non-insulating. •A slope indicator on the unit must be visible to the operator during set up. For mobile units, slope must also be indicated in the cab. Allowable slope limits must be indicated on the unit and in the manual. •The device must remain stable (i.e., not overturn) in all possible positions while sustaining a load 1-1/2 times its rated capacity on firm level ground, and 1-1/3 times its rated capacity on a 5 degree slope. •If stabilizing devices are a design requirement, they must be utilized during load stability testing. •Hydraulic components whose failure could result in movement of the platform, material lifting device, or both must have a minimum bursting strength at least 4 times the maximum design pressure. •Other hydraulic components typically rated for burst must have a minimum bursting strength 3 times the maximum design pressure. If a component is rated by another metric, the minimum bursting strength must be 2 times the maximum design pressure. •Platform "creep" or "drift" (downward movement) must not exceed 4 inches per hour, plus any applicable height allowance, when hydraulic cylinders are fully extended and loaded. •All movements must stop if there is a loss of power or a hydraulic line fails. •Hydraulic systems must meet requirements related to venting, fluid reservoir level indication, fluid cleanliness, cylinder loading, securement of threaded elements, and pressure control. •If stabilizing devices are a design requirement, an interlock device must prevent all boom movements until after these devices are deployed. The interlock is intended as a reminder. It can be temporarily overridden and disabled, as long as it is reset before the next set up of the device. •If oscillating axle locks or controls are a design requirement, an interlock device must prevent boom movements until the oscillation is locked or controlled. •Also, if not designed for mobile use, an interlock device must prevent operation of the device until after the parking or holding brake has been set.
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