Refrigerant Management

SKU: RVI-11517Duration: 20 Minutes

Did you know many refrigerants are harmful to human health and/or the environment? In air conditioning and refrigeration systems, the refrigerant is the substance that circulates through the equipment, transporting heat from one area to another. This interactive online course covers how to execute a refrigerant management program to be compliant with AHJ requirements, identifies EPA Regulations, and describe record keeping requirements.

Course Details

Specs

Training Time: 20 minutes

Compatibility: Desktop, Tablet, Phone

Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

Learning Objectives

  • Describe how to execute a refrigerant management program to be compliant with AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) requirements
  • Identify EPA Regulations
  • Describe record keeping requirements

Key Questions

The following key questions are answered in this module:

What are common refrigerant types?
Chlorofluorocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, halons, and natural refrigerants like propane, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and air.

What is the purpose of EPA regulations?
The purpose of EPA regulations is to minimize Class I and II refrigerant emissions. They prohibit individuals from intentionally venting Class I, Class II, and designated substitute refrigerants while maintaining, servicing, repairing, or disposing of air-conditioning or refrigeration equipment.

What are a couple regulations established under the Clean Air Act?
1. Establishes safe disposal requirements of refrigerants. 2. Restrict the sale of refrigerants to certified technicians.

What is a method to determine when refrigerant leaks are required?
A trigger leak rate is a method for determining when refrigerant leaks are required.

What are examples of Class I refrigerants?
Class I refrigerants cause or contribute significantly to the degradation of the stratospheric ozone layer. This class includes CFCs, halons, and other ODSs.

Sample Video Transcript

Below is a transcript of the video sample provided for this module:

Ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are split into two groups under the Clean Air Act. The substances in each group are listed on the EPA’s website. The groups are divided as follows: 1. Class I refrigerants cause or contribute significantly to the degradation of the stratospheric ozone layer. This class includes CFCs, halons, and other ODSs. 2. Class II refrigerants are known or reasonably anticipated to cause or contribute to harmful effects on the ozone layer. This class includes HCFCs. Besides having a high Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP), many Class I and Class II refrigerants, and some of their substitutes, are potent greenhouse gases with high Global Warming Potential (GWP). A substance’s GWP value reflects its ability to trap heat in the atmosphere and its longevity. As a result, many substitutes for ODS refrigerants, including HFCs like R-134a, are covered by EPA regulations and being phased out.
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