x

Like what you see? Ask us for a full-length preview and pricing options for our entire course catalog

Request full preview

Based on: 30 CFR Part 46.5.b.2

Languages: English

Sample Transcript

Prolonged and repeated exposure to the high noise levels produced by equipment such as drills, conveyors, crushers, diesel engines, and machinery can have a range of damaging and lasting effects on the human ear. Unprotected exposure during use of explosives or close proximity to air horns can also permanently damage hearing. Where noise levels exceed acceptable standards, MSHA requires that miners wear appropriate hearing protection such as ear plugs and/or ear muffs.

Physical Hazards at a Mine

Training Time: 28 minutes

Physical hazards can be created by dangerous energy or force, such as electricity, high noise levels, explosions, and fire. This course provides information on high voltage hazards, such as overhead and downed power lines, energized guy wires, and other contact hazards. Noise hazards, explosive hazards, and fire hazards, such as hot work, are also discussed.

Request full-length preview
Expertly Designed For Maximum Retention
Multiple Language Support
SCORM/AICC Compliant eLearning Modules
Training Content + Interactive Quizzes
Fatal accidents have occurred when haul truck operators raised truck beds into power lines or failed to fully lower truck beds that later contacted lines in transit.

Fatal accidents have occurred when haul truck operators raised truck beds into power lines or failed to fully lower truck beds that later contacted lines in transit.

When operating mobile equipment with dumping beds, articulated booms, or lifts, use extreme caution around overhead power lines.

When operating mobile equipment with dumping beds, articulated booms, or lifts, use extreme caution around overhead power lines.

Hearing loss at higher frequencies may go unnoticed at first. But with prolonged exposure, the loss can reach the lower frequencies used for speech, affecting performance on and off the job.

Hearing loss at higher frequencies may go unnoticed at first. But with prolonged exposure, the loss can reach the lower frequencies used for speech, affecting performance on and off the job.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify hazards and list best practices for avoiding electrical shock from power lines and guy wires
  • Identify hazards and list best practices for hearing protection
  • Identify hazards and list best practices for working around blasting operations
  • Identify fire hazards
  • Identify hazards and list best practices for hot work
Contact us for full course preview

Physcial Hazards at a Mine FAQs

What is the difference between direct and indirect contact with power lines?
Direct contact occurs when a person, tool, or piece of mobile equipment directly contacts the power line or a downed power line. Indirect contact occurs when the power line inadvertently energizes the ground, a body of water, or other conductive surface or structure.

What should a person do if a downed power line makes contact with a piece of equipment that they are in?
If a vehicle or piece of equipment you are in makes contact with an overhead power line, remain calm and do not attempt to exit the vehicle. Immediately call for help and await instructions.

How does a person avoid electric shock?
To avoid electrical shock, use only non-conductive, insulated tools around exposed sources of electrical power.

When is hearing protection required at a mine site?
Where noise levels exceed acceptable standards, MSHA requires that miners wear appropriate hearing protection, such as ear plugs and/or ear muffs.

How can I reduce the risk of blasting hazards at a mine site?
Proper blast planning, blast area management, and blast team communication can greatly reduce the risk of injury or death from blast hazards, including ejected material, known as "flyrock."

What is a "flash burn?"
A "flash burn" is a type of eye injury caused by intensely bright ultraviolet (UV) welding flash. To avoid a flash burn, wear appropriate eye protection, including safety glasses or a welder's face shield, and never look directly at welding flash.

Get pricing info & access full-length samples from our entire catalog