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Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

Sample Transcript

The National Fire Protection Association known as the NFPA created the 70E standard. NFPA 70E is the standard for electrical safety in the workplace. It is a guide for establishing safe practices for working with or near the electrical equipment. Before NFPA 70E, the National Electrical Code created standards for installing electrical equipment but did not discuss working with that equipment. The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration known as OSHA also has standards and booklets on electrical safety that are based on NFPA 70 and NFPA 70E. NFPA 70E is updated every three years because the types of equipment and known best practices can change over time. This module will provide an introduction to NFPA 70E and will summarize some of its important safety guidelines.

NFPA 70E Introduction

Training Time: 26 minutes

NFPA 70E is the “Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace.” It establishes safe practices for working with or near electrical equipment and was created to protect workers from two major electrical dangers, electric shock and arc flash. This course provides an introduction to NFPA 70E and summarizes some of its important safety guidelines, including safety boundaries around electrical equipment, personal protective equipment requirements, and some requirements for electrical equipment and devices.

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Training Content + Interactive Quizzes
The prohibited approach boundary, the restricted approach boundary, and the limited approach boundary (from left to right).

The prohibited approach boundary, the restricted approach boundary, and the limited approach boundary (from left to right).

Shock is one electrical hazard, but it’s not the same as arc flash.

Shock is one electrical hazard, but it’s not the same as arc flash.

An arc flash can be dangerous from over extended distances.

An arc flash can be dangerous from over extended distances.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe why NFPA 70E was created
  • Describe electric shock and arc flash
  • Describe typical main components of an employer Electrical Safety Program
  • Identify safety boundaries around electrical equipment
  • Describe requirements for choosing the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Describe some requirements for electrical equipment and devices, including condition, maintenance, and labeling
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NFPA 70E FAQ's

What is NFPA 70E?
Known as the “standard for electrical safety in the workplace,” NFPA 70E establishes safe working practices in the workplace for working with or near electrical equipment.

What are key electrical hazards?
Electric shock and arc flash.

What is electric shock?
When electric current flows directly through a body, often as a result of the body coming into direct contact with an energized component.

What is arc flash?
What electricity flows from its normal path through the air, superheating the air around it. This can be very hazardous to people in the area.

What are the three electric shock hazard boundaries?
Limited approach boundary, restricted approach boundary, and prohibited approach boundary.

What is the arch flash protection boundary?
The distance from an electrical component at which it is possible to receive a 2nd degree burn if an arc flash were to occur.

What is incident energy?
The amount of heat a surface area would be exposed to if an arch flash occurred.

What is arc-flash rated PPE?
PPE intended to be used in an area where there is an arc flash hazard.

What is an electrical safety program?
An employer’s documented program, intended to protect workers from electrical hazards, that includes program principles, program controls, and program procedures.

What is a “qualified person?”
According to NFPA 70E, a qualified person is one who “has the skills and knowledge related to the construction and operation of the electrical equipment and installations, and who has received safety training to recognize and avoid the hazards involved.”

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