Multi-Stage Turbines

SKU: C-727Duration: 12 Minutes

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Course Details

Specs

Training Time: 12 minutes

Compatibility: Desktop, Tablet, Phone

Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English, Portuguese, French, Polish, Russian

The steam turbine generators used today produce approximately 85% of the electricity in the United States. In a typical turbine, steam flows in at a speed near 100 miles per hour and at temperatures from 400 to 950 degrees Fahrenheit. This course describes the differences between an Impulse and Reaction turbine, why steam turbines are multi-staged, the different types of turbine blade compounding arrangements, or stages and how they relate to turbine efficiency.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify and describe safety hazards associated with the operation of steam turbines
  • Describe the theory of operation of turbines
  • Identify the major components of a multi-stage steam turbine
  • Describe the design of steam turbines
  • Explain why steam turbines are multi-staged
  • Identify and describe the different stages of a multi- stage steam turbine

Key Questions

The following key questions are answered in this module:

How does a steam turbine work?
In a steam turbine, the steam striking the blades on the rotor causes the rotor to turn, producing a given amount of work.

What are the major components of a steam turbine?
The major components of a steam turbine include the casing, the rotor, the fixed and moving blades, diaphragms, journal bearings, a thrust bearing, shaft seals, an inlet valve(s), a speed regulating device, and an extraction valve (on some turbines).

What is a casing?
A casing contains the steam and provides support to the rotor.

What is a rotor?
The turbine rotor holds the moving blades that convert the kinetic energy contained in the steam to rotating mechanical energy.

What are the fixed and moving blades?
The fixed and moving blades convert the kinetic energy to mechanical energy.

What is a diaphragm?
Diaphragms hold the fixed turbine blades.

What are journal bearings?
Journal bearings maintain the radial alignment of the rotor.

What is a thrust bearing?
A thrust bearing maintains the axial alignment of the rotor.

What are shaft seals?
Shaft seals contain the steam in the casing and keep any air out of the condensing unit.

What is an inlet valve?
An inlet valve, or valves, to control the flow of steam to the turbine.

What is a speed regulating device?
A speed regulating device regulates the speed, as you probably guessed.

What is an extraction valve?
An extraction valve controls the pressure of extraction steam (on some turbines).

Sample Video Transcript

Below is a transcript of the video sample provided for this module:

The major components of a steam turbine include a casing, which contains the steam and provides support to the rotor. The turbine rotor, which holds the moving blades that convert the kinetic energy contained in the steam to rotating mechanical energy. The fixed and moving blades, which convert the kinetic energy to mechanical energy. Diaphragms that hold the fixed turbine blades. Journal bearings, which maintain the radial alignment of the rotor. A thrust bearing to maintain the axial alignment of the rotor. Shaft seals to contain the steam in the casing and keep any air out of the condensing unit. An inlet valve or valves to control the flow of steam to the turbine. And a speed regulating device.
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