Line-of-Fire Safety

SKU: C-1130Duration: 8 Minutes

Pay-per-view (PPV) format perfect for individual users.

Get immediate access to this interactive eLearning course online. Must be used within 30 days, expires 48 hours after launch.

Language:  English

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Course Details

Specs

Training Time: 8 minutes

Compatibility: Desktop, Tablet, Phone

Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

Line of fire is a term used to describe being in harm's way. A person in the path of an object or hazardous energy is in the line of fire. Over one-quarter of all workplace fatalities are the result of line-of-fire incidents. This module discusses how to identify common line-of-fire hazards and how to protect yourself and others from those hazards.

Learning Objectives

  • Define what it means to be in the "line of fire"
  • List some common line-of-fire hazards
  • Identify line-of-fire hazards
  • Describe how to protect yourself and others from line-of-fire hazards

Key Questions

The following key questions are answered in this module:

What does line-of-fire mean?
Line of fire is a term used to describe being in harm's way. A person in the path of an object or hazardous energy is in the line of fire.

What are the different types of line-of-fire injuries?
Incidents in which the victim was struck by an object, caught-in or -between objects, or impacted by a release of stored hazardous energy are considered line-of-fire incidents.

What are struck-by injuries?
Struck-by injuries are caused by flying, falling, swinging, or rolling objects.

What are examples of caught-in or -between incidents?
Someone getting pulled into operating machinery or being crushed by heavy equipment are both caught-in or -between incidents.

What does released energy mean?
When stored (potential) energy is released unexpectedly, anyone in the line of fire can be seriously injured or killed.

Sample Video Transcript

Below is a transcript of the video sample provided for this module:

Line-of-fire injuries can be prevented by planning work and identifying potential hazards. To help identify line-of-fire hazards, it is helpful to know some of the most common incident categories. Incidents in which the victim was struck by an object, caught-in or -between objects, or impacted by a release of stored hazardous energy are considered line-of-fire incidents.
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