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Based on: 30 CFR Part 47: Hazard Communication for the Mining Industry 29 CFR 1910.1200: Hazard Communication

Languages: English

Sample Transcript

Your mine's HazCom program must include the following: Identification of chemicals on-site which pose a health hazard to miners, labels and other forms of warnings for such chemicals, documentation of each hazardous chemical on-site with an SDS or MSDS, and plans for training miners in the safe use and handling of hazardous chemicals.

Hazard Communication for Mining

Training Time: 28 minutes

Mining facilities normally have chemicals on-site that require specific labeling and documentation to inform miners about the potential chemicals hazards they may face at work. MSHA's Title 30 CFR - Part 47 Hazard Communication standard, or "HazCom," outlines chemical labeling and documentation requirements to help mine operators reduce injuries and illnesses for miners and mining contractors. This course provides important information on MSHA’s HazCom standard and how it relates to the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS) as well as requirements for MSDS and SDS documentation.

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Training Content + Interactive Quizzes
Chemicals posing health hazards are those for which there is statistically significant evidence that exposure can cause acute or chronic health effects.

Chemicals posing health hazards are those for which there is statistically significant evidence that exposure can cause acute or chronic health effects.

Hazardous chemicals are any liquids, gases, or solids which can harm people or pose risk of injury or property damage if they are reactive, corrosive, combustible, or explosive. This includes water-reactive chemicals.

Hazardous chemicals are any liquids, gases, or solids which can harm people or pose risk of injury or property damage if they are reactive, corrosive, combustible, or explosive. This includes water-reactive chemicals.

An MSDS must contain procedures for clean-up of spills and leaks.

An MSDS must contain procedures for clean-up of spills and leaks.

Learning Objectives

  • State the definition of a chemical hazard
  • Describe mine operators chemical evaluation responsibilities
  • List the potential health and physical hazards of chemical exposure
  • State the purpose of a Hazard Communication, or "HazCom," program
  • State the required elements of a HazCom program
  • Describe how OSHA's GHS (Globally Harmonized System) relates to MSHA's HazCom program
  • State the definition and purpose of a material safety data sheet, "MSDS," and a safety data sheet, "SDS"
  • Describe the contents of an MSDS and an SDS
  • List label and warning requirements for hazardous chemicals
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Hazard Communication for Mining FAQs

Do mine operators need to evaluate each chemical brought onto the mine site?
Yes. Mine operators must evaluate each chemical brought onto or produced on the mine property to determine if it is hazardous.

How do miners know which chemicals are used or produced on the mine site?
Upon request, the mine operator must provide access to the list of chemicals on-site and all Hazard Communication materials to miners and designated representatives, except with regard to trade secrets.

What is the purpose of MSHA's Hazard Communication standard?
The purpose of MSHA's Hazard Communication standard is to reduce injuries and illnesses to each person on the mine site.

What must be included in a mine's HazCom program?
A mine's HazCom program must include identification of on-site chemicals which pose a health hazard, labels for those chemicals, documentation of those chemicals in the form of an SDS or MSDS, and plans for training miners on the safe use and handling of the hazardous chemicals.

How does MSHA's HazCom standard comply with the United Nation's Globally Harmonized System (GHS)?
MSHA acknowledges and accepts that major changes to OSHA's HazCom standard include the new GHS system of classifying types and degrees of hazards, changes to labeling requirements and changes to the material safety data sheet (MSDS) now known as the safety data sheet (SDS).

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