Added to Cart! Click here to view your cart.

First Aid - Snake Bites

SKU: C-897Duration: 23 Minutes Certificate Included

PPV format perfect for individual users.

Get immediate access to this interactive eLearning course online. Must be used within 30 days, expires 48 hours after launch.

Great for in-person classroom training or as an alternative to DVD.

Includes printable documents and Convergence Video Player for Windows systems. Content expires after 1 year.

Ideal for corporate licensing and volume users who also need administrative tracking and reporting on training.

Get this interactive eLearning course into your LMS or learn how you can leverage our LMS to deliver training to your workforce.

Need multiple courses or have lots of users? Just let us know a little more about what you need and we’ll get you some great volume pricing.

 Need help deciding? Compare delivery formats.

Course Details

Specs

Training Time: 23 minutes

 Mobile Compatible

Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages:

  • English

Bites from snakes of any type can be hazardous and require first aid. This is especially true with bites from poisonous snakes. This course focuses on first aid for bites from the four most common poisonous snakes in the United States: rattlesnakes, water moccasins, coral snakes, and copperheads. Information focuses on snake identification, bite prevention, and proper first aid.

At the end of this module, you will be able to:

  • Name the four most common poisonous snakes in the United States
  • Identify each of the four most common poisonous snakes in the United States
  • List some tips for avoiding snakebites
  • List some personal protective equipment (PPE) that can help protect people from snakebites
  • Explain the first aid to provide if a person has been bitten by a poisonous snake
  • Explain the first aid to provide if a person has been bitten by a non-poisonous snake

The following key questions are answered in this module:

What are the four most common poisonous snakes in the United States?
Rattlesnakes, copperheads, water moccasins, and coral snakes.

What are some ways to avoid being bitten by snakes?
Know the type of snakes in your area and where they are likely to be; avoid working in those areas; know their behaviors; stay clear of snakes.

What is some PPE to wear to lessen the risk of snake bite?
Tall boots, long pants tucked into the boots, snake gaiters, protective gloves.

What should you do if someone is bitten by a poisonous snake?
Try to identify the type of snake but don't try to capture or kill it; give the person first aid; have the person relax, be calm, and stay still; and get the person to medical attention.

Below is a transcript of the video sample provided for this module:

Different types of rattlesnakes can be found in many different parts of the United States. Most, however, are found in the American Southwest. Because there are many types of rattlesnakes, they don't all look the same. The average adult size is three to four feet in length, though some may be smaller and others longer. In general, however, their coloring is earth-toned and they often have diagonal patterns on their scales. The easiest way to identify a rattlesnake is by the distinctive rattle at the end of their tail. Rattlesnakes, shake their tail to sound their rattle. This is a signal to stay away.

Use the additional resources and links below to learn more about this topic:

  • Web MD 0 www.webmd.com
  • Snakebite - http://www.webmd.com/first-aid/snakebite-treatment
  • Mayo Clinic – www.mayoclinic.org
  • Snakebite first aid - http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-snake-bites/basics/ART-20056681
  • US National Library – www.nlm.nih.gov
  • Medline snakebite first aid - https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000031.htm
  • Occupational Safety & Health Administration – www.osha.gov
  • OSHA Quick Card - https://www.osha.gov/Publications/rodents_snakes_insects.html
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – www.cdc.gov
  • CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response - http://www.emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/snakebite.asp

Customer Q&A

Be the first to ask a question about this product

Enter your question, and one of our Customer Care experts will respond via email and also post the answer here.

Ask a Question

Sorry, we're missing some information