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Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

First Aid - Flying Insect Stings

Training Time: 16 minutes

Flying insects, such as bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, and even so-called “killer bees” are common throughout the United States. In most cases, they aren’t aggressive and they don’t seek to sting humans. However, when stings do occur, they’re typically minor and require only limited first aid. In other cases, however, especially if the person who’s stung is allergic to the sting, or if the person is stung many times, the situation can be quite severe or even potentially fatal. In this course, you’ll learn how to avoid being stung by flying insects, what to do if someone has been stung and is having a mild reaction, and what to do in the event of a severe reaction to a flying insect sting, including what to do if the stung person is allergic.

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Training Content + Interactive Quizzes
The venom of Africanized honey bees is no more potent than that of the "average" bee, but since a person typically gets stung by many bees instead of one, these incidents can be more dangerous.

The venom of Africanized honey bees is no more potent than that of the "average" bee, but since a person typically gets stung by many bees instead of one, these incidents can be more dangerous.

The Africanized honey bee, also sometimes known as a “killer bee,” defends its hive aggressively and may attack in large numbers.

The Africanized honey bee, also sometimes known as a “killer bee,” defends its hive aggressively and may attack in large numbers.

People who are allergic to stings from insects may have a medic alert bracelet or may carry an injector to help reduce the allergic reaction.

People who are allergic to stings from insects may have a medic alert bracelet or may carry an injector to help reduce the allergic reaction.

Learning Objectives

  • List some flying insects that sting and some characteristics of the insects
  • Identify some ways to avoid being stung
  • Identify some typical symptoms of minor reactions to stings
  • Explain proper first aid for minor stings from flying insects
  • Identify some ways to know if a person is allergic to a flying insect sting
  • Identify some typical symptoms of major reactions to stings
  • Identify proper first aid for more severe reactions to flying insect stings
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First Aid - Flying Insect Stings FAQs

Where in the U.S. are flying insects that sting found?
Pretty much everywhere in the United States.

Are the stings of flying insects usually dangerous or fatal?
No, in most cases, they’re minor events that require only a little first aid.

What are some good ways to avoid being stung?
Leave them alone, wear long clothing, and be observant and cautious while working.

What should a person do if someone’s been stung by a flying insect?
In most cases, apply some minor first aid.

What if the person is having a serious reaction?
Ask if the person has an allergic to insect stings, and/or look for a medic alert bracelet or an injector. Then, call for emergency medical assistance, provide the injection, provide other first aid, and stay with the person until help arrives.

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