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Based on: 30 CFR Part 46.5.b.2

Languages: English

Equipment Hazards at a Mine

Training Time: 40 minutes

Unexpected contact with powerful mobile equipment and moving machine parts at a mine can cause serious injuries and even death. This course discusses common mobile equipment hazards, haul road design, traffic patterns, and other traffic control measures. It illustrates some visual limitations that machine operators experience, including blind spots, the six foot visibility point, and grade visibility. The importance of stationary equipment clearance, guarding, and immobilization are also covered.

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Training Content + Interactive Quizzes
For single-lane roads, an additional roadway width of at least 4 feet should be provided for passage around an immobilized vehicle.

For single-lane roads, an additional roadway width of at least 4 feet should be provided for passage around an immobilized vehicle.

The "six foot visibility point" is the horizontal distance from the driver's position in the cab to the last point at which a six foot tall person will be blocked from view by the vehicle.

The "six foot visibility point" is the horizontal distance from the driver's position in the cab to the last point at which a six foot tall person will be blocked from view by the vehicle.

Stop cords are often located between conveyor belts and walkways and in situations where it may be impractical or impossible to appropriately guard the machinery.

Stop cords are often located between conveyor belts and walkways and in situations where it may be impractical or impossible to appropriately guard the machinery.

Learning Objectives

  • State the importance of safety around powered haulage and mining machinery
  • List common rules for avoiding injuries and fatalities around mobile equipment
  • Describe common surface mine haul road design, traffic patterns, and right of way rules
  • Describe the "six foot visibility point"
  • Identify mobile equipment hazards and describe best practices for avoiding them
  • Identify stationary equipment hazards and describe best practices for avoiding them
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Equipment Hazards at a Mine FAQs

What are some of the most common surface mining fatalaties caused by?
According to MSHA, over half of all fatalities at surface mines commonly involve powered haulage and machinery.

What are some ways to reduce injuries and fatalaties caused by mobile equipment?
To reduce injuries and fatalaties caused by mobile equipment, follow the rules of the road and obey all traffic and warning signs, communicate clearly with equipment operators, stay out of equipment blind spots, and avoid pinch and crush points.

How wide should haul roads be?
Haul roads should be wide enough so that each lane of travel provides clearance on both sides, equal to one-half the width of the widest vehicle in use.

What are blind spots?
"Blind spots" are areas where the operator's view is blocked by the equipment itself.

What are pinch and crush points?
Pinch points, sometimes called "crush points," are dangerous areas within which a worker or a worker's body parts may be crushed by equipment or machinery.

How do I reduce the risk of injury from stationary equipment?
The risk of injury from stationary equipment is drastically reduced when contact is completely avoided or when the machinery is safely and securely stopped, de-energized, blocked, and locked and tagged out.

What are emergency stop cords and what are they designed to do?
Emergency stop cords are safety measures used to prevent injury from moving machine parts and are designed to deactivate the machine if a worker pulls the cord or falls onto it while leaning into a dangerous area.

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