Electrical Architecture

SKU: RVI-11481Duration: 20 Minutes

Pay-per-view (PPV) format perfect for individual users.

Get immediate access to this interactive eLearning course online. Must be used within 30 days, expires 48 hours after launch.

Language:  English

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Course Details

Specs

Training Time: 20 minutes

Compatibility: Desktop, Tablet, Phone

Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

In this course on Electrical Architecture, you'll gain a knowledge of technical requirements on individual electric components, equipment, and entire electrical systems. Key principles covered in this course include switch circuit arrangements, dedicated vs. shared circuits, circuit voltages, heater contactors, and the basics of electrical wiring.

Learning Objectives

  • Compare and contrast the various internal circuit arrangements of a switch (SPST, SPDT, DPDT, etc.)
  • Differentiate between "dedicated" and "shared" circuits
  • Determine voltage for a given circuit
  • State the purpose of a heater on a contactor
  • Given a circuit, determine the insulated jacket colors one might use for line voltage wires
  • Given a circuit, determine the appropriately sized gauge wire that should be installed with it

Key Questions

The following key questions are answered in this module:

What is a transformer?
A transformer is an electrical device that transfers electricity from one AC circuit to another while either increasing or decreasing the voltage.

What are the wire insulation colors for hot, neutral, and ground wires?
The insulation jacket color for hot wires can be black, red, or blue. Neutral wires are white or grey, and ground wires are either green or bare, unjacketed copper.

What is the difference between "dedicated" and "shared" circuits?
In a shared circuit, there are multiple loads, but in a dedicated circuit power is supplied to only one load. Dedicated circuits use a dedicated line voltage, and a shared neutral.

What is the purpose of a switch?
The purpose of a switch is to break, interrupt, or divert the current in a circuit by opening or closing one or more pairs of contacts. There are many different types of switches for different applications. The type of switch is defined by the terms pole and throw. Pole refers to the number of contact pairs, and therefore, the number of circuits controlled by the switch. Throw refers to the number of closed switch positions.

How do you determine appropriate wire gauge based on the circuit amperage rating?
Each circuit will be rated for a certain number of amps. The wires used in the circuit must be sized appropriately for the circuit amperage rating. The higher the amperage rating, the larger the wires need to be. In North America, wire size is measured and identified using the American wire gauge (AWG) system. The gauge value is inversely related to the diameter of a bare conductor, or wire. The higher the gauge number, the smaller the wire.

Sample Video Transcript

Below is a transcript of the video sample provided for this module:

Hot wires deliver electricity from the source to the load. Current flows back to the source through neutral wires. Ground wires provide a safe path for current in case a short circuit occurs. Wire insulation is color-coded to indicate whether they are hot, neutral, or ground. In a 120-volt circuit, the insulation jacket color for hot wires can be black, red, or blue, neutral wires are white or grey, and ground wires are either green or bare, unjacketed copper. Each circuit will be rated for a certain number of amps. The wires used in the circuit must be sized appropriately for the circuit amperage rating. The higher the amperage rating, the larger the wires need to be. In North America, wire size is measured and identified using the American wire gauge (AWG) system. The gauge value is inversely related to the diameter of a bare conductor, or wire. The higher the gauge number, the smaller the wire. Common sizes for electrical wire include 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, and 2. A 20 amp circuit is typically installed with 12 gauge wire.
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