Crane Lift Planning

SKU: C-1131Duration: 26 Minutes

Pay-per-view (PPV) format perfect for individual users.

Get immediate access to this interactive eLearning course online. Must be used within 30 days, expires 48 hours after launch.

Language:  English

Great for trainers or groups who need unlimited online access to multiple courses. Available in two ways:

Cranes and Rigging Series (Details)
Includes 13 courses for $299/year.

Health & Safety (EHS) Library (Details)
Includes 227 courses for $1,199/year.

Ideal for corporate licensing and high volume users.

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Course Details

Specs

Training Time: 26 minutes

Compatibility: Desktop, Tablet, Phone

Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

When involved with a lift have you ever asked yourself, "I wonder if the crane is big enough?" or "Is the rigging set up properly?" or "Is it safe to move loads over or under a power line?". If you have thought of questions like these, then chances are there was too much risk in the lift. In this interactive online course, we will cover why lift planning is important, when a plan is needed, and who prepares the plan. We will also discuss the key roles and responsibilities associated with crane lifting activities and identify what information is contained in a lift plan. Then we will cover the purpose and value of a pre-lift meeting and the function of 3D computer modeling software in creating a lift plan.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize why lift planning is important, when a plan is needed, and who prepares the plan
  • Describe the key roles and responsibilities associated with crane lifting activities
  • Identify what information is contained in a lift plan
  • Describe the purpose and value of a pre-lift meeting
  • Describe the function of 3D computer modeling software in creating a lift plan

Key Questions

The following key questions are answered in this module:

What are some simple, yet preventable causes for crane failure?
Tipping due to overload, damage due to striking a building, or even electrocution due to contacting overhead power lines.

Why should the owner of a building be in involved in the lift planning process?
They hold critical information, such as the locations of underground and overhead structures where the crane will be set up and load-bearing capacity of the structure where the load will be placed.

What are best practices described as?
Those activities that help reduce the risk of injury but aren't necessarily required by regulation. They are the "want to do" rather than the "have to do" practices that add value to completing a task.

What is the rigger responsible for?
The rigger is the person who is responsible for connecting or rigging a load to the crane.

What is the signal person responsible for?
A signal person is responsible for communicating to the crane operator the movement and placement of the load.

Sample Video Transcript

Below is a transcript of the video sample provided for this module:

When is a crane lift plan needed? The short answer is “every time.” Workplace safety regulations require employers to identify and avoid hazards that may put their employees in harm's way. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) establishes workplace safety regulations that employers must follow. This includes crane lift plans for construction, renovation, and certain manufacturing activities. For example, when constructing a building using structural steel, Subpart R of the OSHA standard says that “All hoisting operations in steel erection shall be pre-planned…with the development of a site-specific erection plan”. Planning a lift helps the building owner, crane operator, and supporting personnel such as riggers and signal persons, complete lifting activities without an incident. Although cranes are big pieces of equipment, they are susceptible to failure from very simple, yet preventable causes. These can include tipping due to overload, damage due to striking a building, or even electrocution due to contacting overhead power lines. OSHA regulations and crane manufacturers specify some high-risk situations that require specialized planning. In these instances, a professional, registered engineer may have to review the lift plan calculations and approve the plan. Situations considered high-risk “critical picks” include: • Using more than one crane to pick a load • Picking and carrying the load (moving the crane with the load suspended) • Lifting personnel in a “man” basket • Using a crane on-water on a barge • Picking loads that exceed 75% of the crane’s rated capacity and • Moving loads near power lines or over occupied building spaces
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