OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting Forms

osha-recordkeeping-postThere have been a number of changes that have to do with OSHA’s injury and illness recordkeeping and reporting forms and requirements. And on top of that, there are some deadlines and new “effective dates” coming up.

The injury and illness reporting forms themselves–301, 300, and 300A-were a lot to know about.

And keeping track of the new requirements for recordkeeping, reporting, and online reporting just add to that.

So in this post, we’ll take a look at:

  • What’s reportable and what’s not
  • Who has to report and who doesn’t
  • OSHA’s recordkeeping and reporting forms for injuries and illnesses (forms 301, 300, and 300A)
  • OSHA’s new online reporting and injury requirements for some employers
  • Effective dates for the new requirements
  • Deadlines for reporting

Hopefully this will make everything a little easier to understand for you.

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What Is a Recordable Injury or Illness?

It’s a good idea to review what a recordable injury or illness is, including the stuff you have to keep records of and the stuff you have to report to OSHA. Read all about recordable injuries and illnesses here. 

Remember that OSHA has changed the rules recently about what has to be reported, who has to report, and who’s exempt. Here’s an article that explains OSHA’s recent reporting and recordkeeping changes.

What is OSHA Form 301?

OSHA’s Form 301 is a form you should fill out every time there’s an injury or illness at your workplace.

That means if you’ve had injuries or illnesses at the workplace, and you are not exempt from recordkeeping requirements, you should have done this by now. Read more about OSHA Form 301 here.

OSHA exempts some companies from recordkeeping requirements, and those exemptions change January 1, 2015. According to OSHA:

“However, there are two classes of employers that are partially exempt from routinely keeping injury and illness records.  First, employers with ten or fewer employees at all times during the previous calendar year are exempt from routinely keeping OSHA injury and illness records.  OSHA’s revised recordkeeping regulation maintains this exemption.

Second, establishments in certain low-hazard industries are also partially exempt from routinely keeping OSHA injury and illness records. Starting on January 1, 2015 there will be a new list of industries that will be partially exempt from keeping OSHA records.

Source

As part of the upcoming OSHA changes, some companies will be required to submit Form 301 in a new online website. Please check out our recent blog post that gives you a sneak peek of the user interface of OSHA’s online injury and illness reporting website, and remember this change takes place January 1, 2015.

Check this page from OSHA about recordkeeping for more information on the upcoming changes.

What is OSHA Form 300?

Form 300 is a log of all injuries or illnesses that have occurred during a specific year. You update Form 300 every time there’s a new injury or illness during a given year (unlike how you have to create a new Form 301 every time there’s a new injury or illness). And so it follow that you create a new Form 300 every year.

You can read more about Form 300 here.

As part of the upcoming OSHA changes, some companies will be required to submit Form 300 at that same new online website mentioned earlier. Please check out our recent blog post that gives you a sneak peek of the user interface of OSHA’s online injury and illness reporting website, and remember this change takes place January 1, 2015.

Also remember that you must keep your own copy of Form 300 for at least five years.

Don’t forget to read this page from OSHA about recordkeeping for more information a

What is OSHA Form 300A?

Form 300A is a summary of injury and illness data for a given year. You complete Form 300A early in a given year (2015, for example) and it includes data about injuries and illnesses in the previous year (2014, for example).

You must complete and post Form 300A at your worksite by February 1 and you must keep it posted until April 30 of that same year.

You also must keep Form 300A on file for at least five years following the year that it summarizes. The same is true for Form 300, as we mentioned earlier.

Here’s an article about Form 300A.

Conclusion: What To Do With Your OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting Forms and About Recent OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting Changes

Now’s a good time to make sure you’re doing the reporting and recordkeeping you should and to make sure you understand the upcoming OSHA changes for 2015. First, find out if they affect you, and how. Then, whether you’re affected by the changes or not, make sure you’re compliant with all reporting and recordkeeping requirements imposed on your by OSHA. And, if you’re not, start changing that now.

Jeffrey Dalto

Jeffrey Dalto

Jeffrey Dalto is an Instructional Designer and the Senior Learning & Development Specialist at Convergence Training. Jeff has worked in education/training for more than twenty years and in safety training for more than ten. You can follow Jeff at LinkedIn as well.

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