Lockout/Tagout Glossary (Control of Hazardous Energy 1910.147)

OSHA’s lockout/tagout standard (Control of Hazardous Energy, 1910.147) consistently appears on OSHA’s list of the 10 most commonly cited violations.

As a result, we’ve created this interactive glossary of terms defined in the standard to help you brush up on some of the key concepts.

In addition to this post, we’ve pulled together a second post with a bunch of materials related to lockout/tagout.

Enjoy this one and then move on to the next if you’re interested.

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OSHA Announces Top 10 Violations of 2012

Patrick Kapust, the Deputy Director of OSHA’s Directorate of Enforcement Programs, recently presented OSHA’s list of the 10 most frequently cited violations for 2012.

The list is immediately below. There are two links for each standard in the list. The first link will lead to you the standard itself on OSHA’s website. The second link will lead to a separate webpage created by Convergence Training that includes helpful information, useful links, and a free, downloadable, interactive glossary of all the terms that OSHA described in that regulation.

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Hazard Communication 2012 (HazCom 2012)/GHS Update: Pyrophoric Gases, Simple Asphyxiants, and Combustible Dusts

We recently wrote a post to help you comply with the new labeling requirements mandated by the Hazard Communication/HazCom 2012 alignment with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS).

There are several hazards that aren’t covered by the new labels. Hazards like pyrophoric gases, simple asphyxiants, and combustible dusts have their own unique requirements. Others have been grouped together and labeled as “Hazards Not Otherwise Classified.” In this post, we’re going to talk specifically about the requirements for pyrophoric gasses, simple asphixiants, and combustible dusts.

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Haz-Com and Hazards Not Otherwise Classified (HNOC)

Haz-Com Hazards Not Otherwise Classified (HNOC) Image

We recently wrote a post to help you comply with the new labeling requirements mandated by the Hazard Communication/HazCom 2012 alignment with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS). If you missed that post, you can read it here.

In this post, we’re going to give some information on what OSHA calls “hazards not otherwise classified,” or HNOC.

In addition, you may want to read our other post addressing HazCom requirements for pyrophoric gases, simple asphyxiants, and combustible dusts.

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Hazard Communication 2012 (HazCom 2012) and GHS – Everything You Always Wanted to Know (But Were Afraid to Ask)

By now, you’ve probably heard that the new HazCom 2012 standard has been revised to align with the Globally Harmonized System, or GHS. If we just caught you 100% unaware, you are now excused to go read the information on OSHA’s website about the GHS alignment.

However, we suspect most of you know about this, but that you have been wondering just exactly what it means. Or maybe you’ve wondered about a few of the details. If so, the following is for you. (more…)

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Free Vector HazCom 2012 GHS Pictogram Symbols

We’ve been updating our Online Hazard Communication training to include the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS) label standards. The official GHS pictograms are out there on the internet in a few places, but we weren’t able to find all nine of the major symbols in a single file. Not for free, anyway. So, we cobbled all the symbols together in vector format to make it easier on us as we make our updates, and we thought it’d be nice to make it available for others to use for their GHS-labelling needs.

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Higher Temperatures Increase Heat Illness Hazards

2011 was one of the top 15 hottest years on record. In the contiguous United States, for the period from June 2011 to June 2012, temperatures have been the hottest on record. Higher global temperatures increase the chances of extreme weather, like the severe drought that was seen in Texas this year, and the unusually high heat in England.

An increase in global temperature will lead to a higher likelihood of heat exhaustion and heat stress, so it’s important to recognize these hazards if you’re supervising outdoor workers, or if you are an outdoor worker yourself. High heat can cause body temperatures to rise to dangerous levels if precautions aren’t taken. Heat illnesses can range from heat rash and heat cramps to heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke can result in death.

As OSHA points out on their website post about these increased heat dangers to workers:

“During heat waves we worry about the elderly, people who live alone, the homeless, and others. It’s time to make outdoor workers a part of that group.”

Convergence Training has a 13 minute video course meant to raise awareness of heat illnesses. Click here for a full description of our Heat Stress Causes course.

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OSHA Revises Hazard Communication Standard (1910.1200) to Conform with Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for Chemical Labeling

Maybe you know this already, maybe you’ve heard some whispers but don’t know the full story, or maybe you’re sitting in your chair right now, reading your computer screen and asking yourself “What the heck is this all about?”

Whether you know about this already or not, the fact is that labeling requirements in the United States for hazardous chemicals are about to change.

OSHA has updated their Hazard Communication Standard (1910.1200) so that it will comply with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals. In catchier terms, this is known as the Globally Harmonized System or simply the GHS.

The purpose of the change is to standardize chemical labeling requirements not just within the United States, but throughout the entire world.

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OSHA Offers Free Heat Safety App for iPhone and Android

OSHA’s got a free heat safety app for iPhone and Android phones/devices, and we wanted to make sure you knew about it.

The app calculates the heat index for your site, displays a risk level for your workers, and even gives you precautions to follow to keep workers safe.

We’ve got the link for you to click so you can download the app below. It’s been hot this year, and this isn’t a bad tool to have in the safety and health toolbox.

Here’s what you can go to download the app from the OSHA site.

You can get even more out of the app by backing it up with a fundamental understanding of the causes of heat stress. And we’ve got some stuff for you below to help with that.

Here’s a pretty informative article about heat stress here. Check that out if you’re interested.

This short article focuses on four ways to beat the heat (and heat stress).

OSHA’s got an entire website dedicated to Heat Stress, too–not just an app.

Want to know what causes heat stress? Our Heat Stress Causes eLearning course gives the straight skinny.

And of course, it’s important to know how to prevent heat stress and recognize its symptoms. Our Heat Stress Prevention and Symptoms eLearning course gives you what you need to know.

We know you’re reading this article because of a specific interest in heat stress and the app from OSHA, but why not download a free copy of our Guide to Effective EHS Training since you’re here, too?

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Effective EHS Training: A Step-by-Step Guide

Learn how to design, create, deliver, and evaluate effective EHS training by following these best practices with our free step-by-step guide.

Download Free Guide

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