OSHA Publishes New HazCom 2012/GHS Alignment Training Requirements Fact Sheet

As you probably know, OSHA is revising its old Hazard Communication 1994 Standard and has created a new Hazard Communication 2012 Standard. The new HazCom 2012 Standard is “aligned” with the Globally Harmonized System, also known as GHS.

You may also know that employers have an obligation to train their employees about certain aspects of the new GHS-aligned HazCom 2012 Standard before December 1, 2013 (this year). This deadline is mentioned on OSHA’s website on a page titled Effective Dates. And it has also been the subject of one of our earlier blog posts explaining What to Know and Do for HazCom 2012/GHS During 2013.

But, you’d be forgiven if you didn’t know that OSHA recently published a Fact Sheet titled December 1st, 2013 Training Requirements for the Revised Hazard Communication Standard. That’s because it’s brand new. We just recently learned of it ourselves.

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Electrical General Requirements Word Game (1910.303)

electrical-wiring-methods-word-game

As a kid, one of my favorite villains on the Amazing Spiderman was Electro, a walking, talking electrical hazard. Creating Electro as an arch-villain seems appropriate, because electricity can present many hazards at home and at work. And apparently, some people are either not aware of these hazards or are not taking them seriously enough, because the Electrical, General Requirements standard often appears on OSHA’s list of most commonly cited violations.

In this post, we’ve got a fun word game that lets you test your knowledge of electrical terms related to 1910.303 (the words and definitions themselves come from 1910.399, where all definitions for the subpart are listed). Hope you enjoy this one!

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Lockout Tagout Word Game (Control of Hazardous Energy 1910.147)

electrical-word-game

What do you do when there’s a hazard?

As any horror movie aficionado will tell you, you lock the hazard out (although discriminating horror-movie watchers may remember that strategy didn’t work so well in The Shining).

But I digress. When it comes to hazardous energy, you definitely want to lock it out and tag it out before working on a machine or equipment. As we all know from OSHA’s Control of Hazardous Energy-Lockout/Tagout regulation (1910.147).

In this article, we’ve got a fun lockout/tagout word game to help you remember all that. You can play it online from this blog post as often as you want. We’ve even set up an option so you can download a free copy for yourself.

Good luck with the game. Or, as the French would say, bon chance!

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Four Ways to Prepare for Heat Stress at Work (Before it’s Too Late)

In some parts of the country, the mercury is already skyrocketing up the thermometer. A quick look at today’s weather map shows about half the country with temps in the 80s or 90s.

It’s important to be aware of hot weather because workers can suffer serious problems and even die when working in high temperatures. So what can you do as an employer or supervisor to protect your workers? Well, one thing you can do is be aware of the hazard and know how to lessen the risk.

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Free Electrical-Wiring Methods Word Game (1910.305)

electrical-wiring-methods-word-game

It was the Star Trek character Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy who once said “Damn it, Jim, I’m a doctor, not an electrician!”

Actually, I don’t think he ever said that. But YOU might say something like that after trying your hand at this Convergence Word Game based on OSHA’s Electrical-Wiring Methods (1910.305) regulation.

We’ve got it set up for you so you can play the game right here from our blog as many times as you wish, or you can download a free copy and import it into your SCORM-compliant LMS and play it from the LMS. It’s all right below the red MORE button. 🙂

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Powered Industrial Trucks Word Game (1910.178)

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Here’s a fun little word Jeopardy-style word game to quiz your knowledge of powered industrial trucks (PITs). It’s drawn from the definitions in OSHA’s 1910.178 Standard (Powered Industrial Trucks).

Hope you enjoy it.

We’ve got this set up so you can use it in one of two ways.

The first is that you can play the word game right here from our blog. Easy!

The second is that you can download a free copy for yourself. If you do that, you’ve got to import it into your SCORM-compliant LMS to play the game.

All the fun awaits you on the other side of the red MORE button. See you there!

 

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Machine Guarding Word Game-1910.212

electrical-word-game

Here’s another of our popular and fun to play safety word games.

This one quizzes you on your knowledge of machine guarding, and is drawn from the definitions in OSHA’s 1926.212 Standard (Machinery and Machine Guarding Definitions).

We’ve got this set up so you can play it in either of two ways.

First, you can play it only from this blog article. Just click the red MORE button to begin.

And second, there’s an option where you can download the game for free, import it into your SCORM-compliant LMS, and play it from your LMS.

Hope you enjoy.

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OSHA’s Form 300A: Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses

OSHA Form 300A Image

In earlier posts, we’ve described how to determine if an injury or illness at the workplace is work-related and recordable, and, if it is, how to complete OSHA’s Form 301, Injury and Illness Incident Report, and OSHA’s Form 300, Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.

If you want to review those issues, click the links below:

In this post, we’ll explain how and when to complete OSHA’s Form 300A: Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.

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OSHA Form 300: Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses

OSHA Form 300 Log of Work Related Injuries and Illnesses Image

In earlier posts, we’ve described how to determine if an injury or illness at the workplace is work-related and recordable, and, if so, how to complete OSHA’s Form 301, Injury and Illness Incident Report.

If you want to review those issues, click the links below:

In this post, we’ll explain how to complete OSHA’s Form 300: Log of Work-Related Injuries
and Illnesses.

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OSHA’s Form 301: Injury and Illness Incident Report

OSHA Form 301 Injury and Illness Record Image

In an earlier post, we explained how you can determine if an injury or illness is “work-related” and “recordable.”

In this post, we’ll explain one of the first steps to take if you do have a work-related, recordable injury or illness at the workplace: complete OSHA’s Form 301, Injury and Illness Report.

When Should You Complete OSHA Form 301?

You must complete the Injury and Illness Incident Report within seven calendar days after you receive information that a recordable work-related injury or illness has occurred at your work place.

Remember, our earlier blog post will help you determine if an injury or illness is work-related and recordable. You’ll also want to decide if this is a new case or a recurring case. Read 1904.6, Determination of New Cases, for more information on this.

Don’t forget that in addition to these requirements, OSHA expects employers to very quickly report to OSHA when a work-related fatality or severe injury has occurred. Any fatality must be reported to OSHA within 8 hours, and any in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be reported to OSHA within 24 hours. To report these, you can:

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What Is an OSHA Recordable Work-Related Injury or Illness?

OSHA recordable work-related injury or illness image

If a worker is injured or becomes ill at work, the employer will often have to record the incident as a “work-related injury or illness” on OSHA’s Form 301, Injury and Illness Report, and OSHA’s Form 300, Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.

In this article, we’ll explain to you exactly what a recordable injury or illness is and which establishments have to do the recording.
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