Knowledge, Philosophy & Safety: A Conversation with Nick Travaglini

As a safety professional, you want to know about the world around you. But that begs the question–what DO you know about the world around you, how do you know that, and how can you apply all of this to helping create safer, healthier workplaces for everyone in your organization.

  • We recently met Nick Travaglini while listening to him discussing the intersections between philosophy and occupational safety at one of the GREAT online learning experiences that Ron Gantt has been hosting since the COVID-19 pandemic began. In three consecutive talks, he discussed a chronology of knowledge, if you will, in western civilization by discussing three works:

    Rene Descartes, The Discourse on the Method, a seminal work that helped set up the Enlightenment and the Newtonian mechanistic world view

  • Fritjof Capra, The Turning Point: Science, Society & The Rising Culture, anTod in particular a chapter on Einstein and physics since Einstein
  • Todd May, Gilles Deleuze: An Introduction (a book about a French post-structuralist philosopher who sought to take lessons from post-Einsteinian physics and apply them to our lives and thought

Give the video below a listen and see what you think. We talk about lots of stuff of interest to safety professionals, including root-cause analysis and how to use diversity to get better opinions and ideas.

We’ve also included some links below to things that came up during the discussion.

Todd Conklin, Pre-Accident Investigation Podcast Series 

Sidney Dekker, Drift into Failure 

 

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Free On-Demand Webinar: Why Apply HPI?

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Human Performance Improvement, or HPI, is a field or thought (or philosophy, or mindset, or management system) dedicated to helping humans working more effectively within their workplace systems. We recently invited our friend Joe Estey, a human performance improvement specialist, to discuss HPI with us in a live webinar that we’re now offering in a recorded, on-demand version.

View our Why Apply HPI? Webinar at our Webinars webpage.

We hope you enjoy the webinar and invite you to check out collection of workforce training online courses.

We’ve also included a series of links related to HPI (and similar fields, such as Safety Differently, Safety II, and HOP, or human and organizational performance) as well as a free infograpic that reproduces the famous Workplace Performance Improvement flowchart by Mager and Pipe, below.

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Free Guide to OSHA Compliance for the Construction Industry

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OSHA’s 1926 standards provide safety regulations for American employers in the construction industry (along with some additional regulations that apply to all US employers, such as OSHA’s General Duty clause).

To help construction industry employers meet their OSHA compliance requirements, we’ve created this handy Guide to OSHA Construction Compliance, which is based on OSHA’s Compliance Assistance Quick Start for the Construction Industry.

Of course, every organization is unique and no guide (not even OSHA’s Quick Start) can guarantee your organization is compliant, but we think you’ll find this guide does a great job in alerting you to much of what you need to do to get into compliance. We’ve even included a checklist at the end that you can use and modify for your own compliance needs.

Also, stay tuned for our upcoming Guide to Construction Safety Training, which we anticipate having ready for you all next month.

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OSHA’s “Fatal Four” In Construction: Leading Causes of Fatalities in Construction

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In this article, we’ll be talking about workplace fatalities. Workplace fatalities in the construction industry, to be more specific. And to be even more specific, about the four hazards that OSHA calls “The Fatal Four” in construction because of how many construction workplace fatalities involve these hazards.

Before we do, it’s worth getting some perspective. According to OSHA, just a little over 21% of worker fatalities in private industry in a recent year (2018) occurred in the construction industry. So we’re talking about an industry with a significant amount of fatalities.

In this article, we’ll let you know what the Fatal Course hazards are, link you to relevant resources and OSHA standards, and provide some safety training tips for each as well.

And since the larger focus of this article is about workplace fatalities and preventing them, you might also find our Preventing Workplace Fatalities and Using Risk-Based Approaches to Reduce Serious Injuries and Fatalities (SIFs) articles of interest.

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Thoughts on Safety Metrics & Safety Measurement (With Carsten Busch)

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Safety metrics and measurement is a big issue and it’s not as simple as it may seem at first.

We caught up with our friend Carsten Busch to discuss safety measurement and safety metrics in some detail. Hope you enjoy this discussion. You may remember Carsten from our previous discussion on Safety Myths or from his own MindtheRisk website or social media postings. Additionally, you may find our earlier discussion with Pam Walaski, Safety Metrics Reconsidered, worth a listen on this issue.

Be sure to check out Carsten’s books:

 

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OSHA Basics: OSHA’s Upcoming Regulatory Agenda (Unified Agenda)

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Ever wonder if OSHA’s planning to release new or updated standards or even where to find out that kind of information.

Well, there is an easy way to know. OSHA publishes what they call their “unified agenda” online at the OSHA website.

We’ll tell you more in the article below, plus we’ve included a free guide to OSHA General Industry Compliance at the bottom of this article for you to download.

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OSHA Updates Guidance on Recordkeeping for COVID-19 Infections (Goes Into Effect May 26, 2020)

Please note: OSHA published a guidance regarding recordkeeping for COVID-19 infections on April 10, 2020, and then released a new, revised guidance after that. The earlier guidance is still in effect, and it will be in effect until May 26, 2020. We’ve already written an article about the earlier guidance, and we’ll update that article on May 26 to match the terms of the new guidance. This article is a brief explanation of the new guidance that goes into effect May 26.

OSHA’s published a revised guidance regarding COVID-19 infections and recordkeeping that goes into effect May 26, 2020. You can read that new guidance at the OSHA website.

We’ve going to wait until the new guidance goes into effect before we update our earlier article, getting into all the details, but feel free to read OSHA’s new guidance on your own, paying special attention the following two changes:

1. The second, revised guidance no longer has different rules for correctional facilities, the healthcare industry, and emergency response organizations. Employers in all industries will be treated the same.

2. The second, revised guidance has additional explanations of determining if an infection should be considered “work-related” during the time of widespread community transmission.

For additional information about OSHA and COVID-19, you might also want to check out:

Beyond that, you might want to read our short article on 4 OSHA Training Requirements for COVID-19 and/or our much longer article about OSHA Safety Training Compliance & COVID-19.

Don’t forget to download the free guide below, too. Remember, though–it doesn’t include the COVID-19 specific information discussed in this article, although it will help you as you go through this process.

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Free OSHA Injury & Illness Reporting & Recordkeeping Guide Download

Download this free guide to learn what you need to know about OSHA requirements for injury & illness reporting and recordkeeping.

Download Free Guide

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OSHA’s Guidance on Recording Cases of COVID-19

Please note: the article below is based on an OSHA guidance published on April 10, 2020. Since this article was written, OSHA has published a new, revised guidance covering recording COVID-19 cases. The older guidance is still currently in effect, but the second, but on May 26, 2020, the earlier guidance will be rescinded and the new guidance will be in effect. You can read the new, revised guidance here, and we’ll update the article below on May 26, 2020. The two primary differences are that in the new guidance, all industries are treated the same (so there are no different, more stringent sets of rules for healthcare, emergency response, and correctional facilities) and the rules for determining if an infection was likely to be work-related or not are more articulated. 

OSHA’s published a guidance on recording cases of COVID-19 infections for employers. You can read the entire guidance, and we recommend that you do that, but we’ve also summarized it for you below.

In addition, you might also want to check out the following from OSHA on COVID-19:

Beyond that, you might want to read our short article on 4 OSHA Training Requirements for COVID-19 and/or our much longer article about OSHA Safety Training Compliance & COVID-19.

But now let’s get into the details of OSHA’s guidance on recording COVID-19 infections. And if you scroll down to the very bottom, you’ll see we’ve included a free guide to OSHA Recordkeeping & Reporting you can download as well (the guide does not have this information specific to COVID-19, however).
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OSHA Offers Helpful Resource for Wearing Respirators Safely at Work

OSHA’s been creating a lot of helpful materials related to workplace safety and COVID-19, and they recently created some materials to help workers wear respirators correctly to preserve their safety.

One of those new OSHA resources is this OSHA Poster titled Seven Steps to Correctly Wear a Respirator at Work. Another is this OSHA Video titled Putting On and Taking Off a Mask.

Additionally, there are a lot of guidances at the OSHA COVID-19 Safety and Health Topic webpage regarding respirators at work that you should check out (in particular, check out the Enforcement Memoranda).

On top of all that, you might also want to check out the following, more general materials from OSHA on COVID-19:

And before you leave, you might want to read our short article on 4 OSHA Training Requirements for COVID-19 and/or our much longer article about OSHA Safety Training Compliance & COVID-19.

Stay safe, friends!

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OSHA’s Guidance for the Package-Delivery Workforce & COVID-19

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If you’re a safety professional or worker in the package-delivery industry, and you haven’t yet seen this, OSHA published a guidance for COVID-19 and the package delivery workforce. Do yourself a favor and check it out.

In addition, you might also want to check out the following from OSHA on COVID-19:

Beyond that, you might want to read our short article on 4 OSHA Training Requirements for COVID-19 and/or our much longer article about OSHA Safety Training Compliance & COVID-19.

Please use the comments to share any experiences, insights, suggestions, or cautions you may have. And stay safe and healthy!

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OSHA’s Guidance for the Construction Industry Workforce & COVID-19

If you’re a safety professional in the construction industry, and you haven’t yet seen this, OSHA published a guidance for COVID-19 and the construction industry workforce. Do yourself a favor and check it out.

In addition, you might also want to check out the following from OSHA on COVID-19:

In addition, you might want to read our short article on 4 OSHA Training Requirements for COVID-19 and/or our much longer article about OSHA Safety Training Compliance & COVID-19.

Please use the comments to share any experiences, insights, suggestions, or cautions you may have. And stay safe and healthy!

And be sure to download our free guide to OSHA Construction Compliance while you’re here. 

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Guide to OSHA Construction Industry Compliance

Get some helpful tips for complying with OSHA’s requirements for employers in the construction industry. Remember, all workplaces have unique hazards and compliance requirements and this guide can’t guarantee compliance for all workplaces.

Download Free Guide

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