Machine Guarding Glossary (1910.212)

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To satisfy your insatiable curiosity, we created an interactive glossary of terms from OSHA’s Machine Guarding Standard (1910.212).

That’s it, right below. You can check it out now, and/or you can bookmark this page and come back whenever you’re curious. Hope you enjoy this.

Convergence Training is a training solutions provider. We make off-the-shelf EHS e-learning courses, several learning management systems (LMSs), custom training solutions, and more. Contact us to see full-length previews, set up a demo, or just ask a few questions.

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Powered Industrial Trucks Interactive Glossary (1910.178)

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Every year, OSHA creates a list of the ten most commonly cited standard violations. Here’s the most recent list–OSHA’s Top Ten for 2015.

Because the same standards typically appear year after year, we make a lot of resources available to our readers for each of those standards. That includes free downloadable safety word games, blog posts chock full of informational and training resources, and interactive glossaries about the terms defined in the standard.

And that’s what we’ve got for you in this article–an interactive glossary of terms defined in OSHA’s Powered Industrial Truck (PIT) standard, 1910.178.

Just click the MORE button below to check it out.

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Essential Steps on the Way to Teaching Something: Robert Gagne’s “Nine Events of Instruction”

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Have you heard the Miles Davis song “Seven Steps to Heaven?”

Well, this post isn’t about that song. Although it’s a great tune, to be sure. You’ve got to love that bass playing by Ron Carter and you can tell that this band was on its way to being Miles’ next great quintet.

Why mention the song, then? To make a comparison between the song title and the real topic of this post, of course. The title of Davis’ tune alludes to two things. The first is a sequential, orderly process—the seven steps. And the second is the desired end place—heaven.

There’s something similar in instruction (or training), too. It’s called the Nine Events of Instruction, and it’s based on a theory by instructional designer Robert Gagne.

Just like the Davis song title, Gagne’s theory also suggests a sequential, orderly process–the nine steps. And it leads to a desired end place–effective instruction/training. If you’re in the world of instructional design, training, or human performance improvement, effective training is the desired end place you’re interested in. So we don’t have to tell you why you’d want to know what those nine events are.

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Powered Industrial Truck Checklists for Safety and Operations

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Here are some powered industrial truck checklists you can download for free–nice! (We’ve got more free downloadable checklists on other topics here.)

We’ve got two series of checklists for you. And each series includes two actual checklists.

There’s one series for PITs with internal combustion engines (gas, LPG, and diesel), and there’s another series for electric-powered PITs.

So all told, you’ll get a single ZIP folder with four checklists–two for electric PITs, and two for internal combustion PITs. Just scroll your way to the bottom of this article and look for the black download button.

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Lockout/Tagout Glossary (Control of Hazardous Energy 1910.147)

OSHA’s lockout/tagout standard (Control of Hazardous Energy, 1910.147) consistently appears on OSHA’s list of the 10 most commonly cited violations.

As a result, we’ve created this interactive glossary of terms defined in the standard to help you brush up on some of the key concepts.

In addition to this post, we’ve pulled together a second post with a bunch of materials related to lockout/tagout.

Enjoy this one and then move on to the next if you’re interested.

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OSHA Announces Top 10 Violations of 2012

Patrick Kapust, the Deputy Director of OSHA’s Directorate of Enforcement Programs, recently presented OSHA’s list of the 10 most frequently cited violations for 2012.

The list is immediately below. There are two links for each standard in the list. The first link will lead to you the standard itself on OSHA’s website. The second link will lead to a separate webpage created by Convergence Training that includes helpful information, useful links, and a free, downloadable, interactive glossary of all the terms that OSHA described in that regulation.

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Improving OJT with an LMS

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Note: An earlier blog post gave some tips for setting up effective on-the-job training (OJT) programs at work. It’s not necessary to read that post before reading this one, but if you want to, it’s there for you.

If you’re giving some thought to the best ways to implement an OJT program at work, you’re already making some good initial steps. But have you thought about how your OJT program could benefit if you use it in combination with a learning management system (LMS)?

In this article, we’ll take a look.

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Hazard Communication 2012 (HazCom 2012)/GHS Update: Pyrophoric Gases, Simple Asphyxiants, and Combustible Dusts

We recently wrote a post to help you comply with the new labeling requirements mandated by the Hazard Communication/HazCom 2012 alignment with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS).

There are several hazards that aren’t covered by the new labels. Hazards like pyrophoric gases, simple asphyxiants, and combustible dusts have their own unique requirements. Others have been grouped together and labeled as “Hazards Not Otherwise Classified.” In this post, we’re going to talk specifically about the requirements for pyrophoric gasses, simple asphixiants, and combustible dusts.

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Haz-Com and Hazards Not Otherwise Classified (HNOC)

Haz-Com Hazards Not Otherwise Classified (HNOC) Image

We recently wrote a post to help you comply with the new labeling requirements mandated by the Hazard Communication/HazCom 2012 alignment with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS). If you missed that post, you can read it here.

In this post, we’re going to give some information on what OSHA calls “hazards not otherwise classified,” or HNOC.

In addition, you may want to read our other post addressing HazCom requirements for pyrophoric gases, simple asphyxiants, and combustible dusts.

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