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Based on: Industry Standards and Best Practices

Languages: English

Sample Transcript

Arc Welding Basics

Training Time: 34 minutes

Arc welding is one of several fusion processes for joining together metals. This course will cover basic arc welding circuits, joint types, the different parts of a weld, welding symbols, welding safety, different welding techniques, and defective welds.

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An AC or DC power source fitted with controls is connected by a work cable to the workpiece and by a "hot" cable to an electrode holder.

An AC or DC power source fitted with controls is connected by a work cable to the workpiece and by a "hot" cable to an electrode holder.

Specific welding dangers include electric shock, heat, fire, rays, and fumes

Specific welding dangers include electric shock, heat, fire, rays, and fumes

For both practical and safety reasons, use a relatively low voltage in welding circuits.

For both practical and safety reasons, use a relatively low voltage in welding circuits.

Key Topics Covered in This Course

  • Basic arc welding circuit
  • Joint types
  • The different parts of a weld
  • Welding symbols
  • Welding Safety
  • Different welding techniques
  • Defective welds
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Arc Welding Basics FAQs

What is arc welding?
Arc welding is one of several fusion processes for joining together metals. By applying intense heat, the metal at the joint between two parts is melted and caused to intermix directly or, more commonly, with an intermediate molten filler metal. Upon cooling and solidification, a metallurgical bond is created.

What are the five basic welding joint types?
The five basic types of welding joints include the: Butt Joint – A joint between two members lying approximately in the same plane; Corner Joint – A joint between two members located approximately at right angles to each other in the form of an angle; Edge Joint – A joint between the edges of two or more parallel or mainly parallel members; Lap Joint – A joint between two overlapping members; Tee Joint – A joint between two members located approximately at right angles to each other in the form of a “T”.

What are some of the top welding dangers that can occur in a workplace?
Specific welding dangers include: electric shock (high voltage is used), heat (source of intense heat), fires (from flying sparks and hot metals), rays (gives off both ultraviolet and infrared rays), and fumes (electrodes give rise to a degree of fume and smoke).

What should you concentrate on when laying down a bead after an arc has been established?
It’s important to concentrate on maintaining your arc length, and the size of your molten pool.

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